Plantar Fasciitis Stretches


Plantar fasciitis means inflammation of your plantar fascia Your plantar fascia is a physically powerful band of tissue like a muscle that stretches from your heel to your focus foot bones. It supports the arch of your foot and too acts as a shock absorber in your foot. Plantar fasciitis is common. About 1 in 10 people will find plantar fasciitis at some time in their life. It is the majority common in people between the ages of 40 to 60 years. However, it can happen at any age. It is twice as frequent in women as men. It is too common in athletes.

Tears of the plantar fascia are a less commonly found injury than either a heel spur or plantar fasciitis. They usually involve larger and more abrupt forces than the forces which allow for plantar fasciitis to develop. High speed activity develop these forces more often. The force needs to be applied to the ball of the foot. Sprinting places the foot in a position in which this could happen. Soft shoes that bend in the arch may contribute. Plantar fascia tears may also occur in baseball or softball players when sliding in to a base with the foot making contact with the base.

Morning plantar fasciitis is commonly the most painful type of heel pain associated with this condition. This is because pain from plantar fasciitis is often felt more in the morning. After long periods of rest, such as after waking up in the morning, an inflamed area of the plantar fascia ligament becomes stressed when pressure is put on it. The first steps taken in the morning are usually extremely painful. Terrible morning plantar fasciitis pain results from the plantar fascia ligament being over stretched and becoming inflamed within a few steps.

Inappropriate footwear is the No. 1 cause of plantar fasciosis. Footwear that possesses toe spring and a tapered toe box holds your big toe in an adducted and extended position. In this position, your abductor hallucis muscle—the muscle responsible for moving your big toe away from your foot’s midline—pulls on a foot structure called the flexor retinaculum and may restrict blood flow through your posterior tibial artery, the vessel that carries blood to the bottom of your foot. Tissues in the sole of your feet begin to degenerate as blood supply to this area is decreased.

The plantar fascia is located on the underside of your foot. It is a connective tissue that runs along the arch of the foot from the heel to the bones on the ball of the foot. The plantar fascia stabilizes your toes and absorbs shock for your legs. The American Council on Exercise states that impact activities such as running, aerobics and plyometrics can irritate and inflame the plantar fascia. Plantar fasciitis is associated with pain originating at the heel and running the length of the bottom of the foot. Pain is usually most prevalent in the morning when you wake up and begin walking. plantar fasciitis sock

If you've never experienced the pain that accompanies heel spurs and plantar fasciitis consider yourself lucky. This common problem is debilitating for many people. It causes intense heel pain or pain anywhere on the bottom of your foot. The symptoms are usually worse during the first few steps and gradually decrease once you walk around. However, some people are in pain all day long. It can effect a sedentary person, a skinny person, an overweight person, or an athlete. It alters how you walk and move throughout the day and may cause back pain. People look all over for remedies to their pain, usually to no avail.

Stretching the calf muscles is an important part to reducing plantar fascia tension. The calf muscles, including the gastroc and soleus, attach to the back of the heel. Tension from these muscles pulls back on the heel, causing tension on the plantar fascia. A great way to stretch the calf the first thing in the morning, before you take your first steps, is to hook a towel on the ball of your foot and while keeping the knee straight pull back on the towel. Hold the stretch for a minimum of 30 seconds and repeat a few times.

Other effective techniques include use of a slant board ( Figure 3 ) or placing a two-inch × four-inch piece of wood ( Figure 4 ) in areas where the patient stands for a prolonged time (e.g., workplaces, kitchen or stoves) to use in stretching the calf. Dynamic stretches such as rolling the foot arch over a 15-oz size can or a tennis ball are also useful ( Figure 5 ) Cross-friction massage above the plantar fascia ( Figure 6 ) and towel stretching ( Figure 7 ) may be done before getting out of bed and serve to stretch the plantar fascia.

The Achilles tendon is a group of tissues that connect the heel bone to your calf muscles. When these are inflamed, you have Achilles tendonitis. The plantar fascia is also a group of tissues; but, this links the toes to your heel. Home remedies work well for both the conditions. The treatment of plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis are almost the same. When ice packs and stretching exercises don't work for plantar fasciitis, it may be advisable for you to visit a podiatrist. A new therapy called ESWT or 'Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy' is recommended. The therapy may take about 4 months for complete cure.

As we all know, all our tissues are connected to muscles, and other tissues. Therefore, it is necessary to rehabilitate connected areas of the feet as well. One of the important plantar Fasciitis stretches is the calf stretch and this helps to loosen the calf muscles that in turn, help remove pain on the arch of the feet. To do this, you have to stand facing a wall, about 1 to 2 feet from it. Then, stretch out your arms and lean towards the wall with the arms serving as your anchor. You should place one foot at the front and the other at the back. plantar fasciitis
03/10/2014 12:08:05
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